Renault’s homegrown TV ad

17 April 2009

French carmaker Renault has flighted its first television advert made and produced in South Africa, adding more local flavour to its South African-made entry-level hatchback, the Sandero.

Multinational advertising company Publicis was chosen to chosen to create the campaign that positions the Sandero range, which starts at under R100 000, as “proudly South African” but oozing French style, spaciousness, robustness and reliability.

“The Sandero is a very important product for us in South Africa, showing our commitment to this market,” Renault South Africa’s Regis Fricotte said in a statement this week.

“With the car being manufactured in South Africa, we thought it was important for the advertising campaign to be rooted in South African culture, matching the product with the aspirations of the targeted consumer.”

‘More than transport’

Publicis’ brief was to transform the perception of Renault from being a niche or aspirational brand to one that was accessible, affordable and spontaneous, while still appealing to the image-conscious driver.

“The message we want to get across is that the Sandero is more than a mere mode of transport – it is an expression of self for people who are trendsetters, streetwise and dynamic,” said Publicis’ Tim Allemann.

The overall campaign consists of 10-second television teasers using kinetic typography and a 30-second television commercial, supplemented by print and radio advertisements.

Filming in Ghandi Square

The commercial also notched up another first, with production company Suburban Films and director Miles Goodall being given permission by Johannesburg city authorities to completely cordon off Gandhi Square in the city centre for the filming of the advertisement.

Children, a dog, remote controlled Sandero replicas, computer generated graphics, other special effects, and a vibrant Kwaito soundtrack are all crammed into the 30-second commercial.

Publicis creative director Kamlesh Jogee said the key concept of the television commercial was the car’s price and features, and that it was targeted at young black males who could not be “pigeon-holed or stereotyped, and [were] not fazed by convention”.

“Importantly, we have had excellent international feedback on the quality of the television commercial and the print and radio campaigns, all of which are home-grown for the emerging market we are targeting,” he said.

Source: BuaNews