Biking from Beitbridge to Cape Point

South Africans Misty and Dylan Weyer received a warm welcome at Cape Point on 1 November after completing a gruelling two-month mountain biking trip along the Dragon’s Spine – from Beitbridge, southern Zimbabwe, to Cape Town’s Cape Point, via neighbouring Lesotho – to raise funds for children with cerebral palsy.

The couple, who hails from East London, set off from Beitbridge on Sunday 1 September, riding eight to 12 hours a day without a support crew to complete the 4 000 km mountain bike route, which runs mainly on district roads and jeep and animal tracks, with a few tar exceptions.

malamulele 1Dylan and Misty Weyer getting into the funicular at Cape Point Nature Reserve to celebrate the end of their epic 4 000km journey from Beit Bridge border post to Cape Point to raise funds for children with cerebral palsyCape Point funicular staff, lead by general manager, Celeste Bell, welcomed the couple and treated them to a trip up the funicular to experience the unbeatable view from the topmost lighthouse.

Bell says: “Upon hearing about Misty and Dylan’s epic journey we decided these inspiring people deserved a special welcome. A warm meal at the Two Oceans restaurant and a funicular ride to the top of the cliffs overlooking the Point with views of the colliding currents is a wonderful way to celebrate their achievement of raising awareness of cerebral palsy – we commend them.”

Occupational therapist, Misty, and environmental scientist, Dylan, are extreme adventure seekers who put their minds, bodies and four-year marriage to the test in tackling the Dragon’s Spine.

The couple wanted to raise funds for non-profit organisation (NPO) Malamulele Onward, where Misty works as a field therapist. She treats children with cerebral palsy in Butterworth in the Eastern Cape and is a project manager for the Carer-2-Carer training programme, where she trains parents of children with cerebral palsy to run workshops for other parents in 10 rural areas.

“We had a strong conviction that our two-month adventure could not simply be for our own enjoyment, so we decided to do it for a cause,” said Misty.

“We are blessed to have seen such a beautiful part of our country, while doing what we love and raising money for charity. Cerebral palsy is a complex disability and without access to specialised treatment and a good understanding of the condition, both parents and their children are victims of a very difficult journey.”

Johannesburg-based Malamulele Onward provides specialised therapy services, equipment and caregiver training to 11 poorly resourced rural areas in South Africa and Lesotho, where children severely disabled by cerebral palsy have little or no access to rehabilitation therapy and equipment.

The Weyers will also give 10% of funds raised to Greensleeves Place of Safety, an East London NPO providing residential care for abandoned and abused children.

“Although we have not reached our goal of R200 000 yet, the funds are slowly coming in and are testament to the physical, mental and spiritual challenges we have experienced on this journey,” said Misty.

“We will continue to use this event to raise funds and awareness for another three months and hopefully reach our goal by the end of January 2014.We are extremely grateful to each and every person who showed their support and opened their hearts, minds, pockets, and homes for our cause.”

For more information visit www.groupspaces.com/DragonsSpine4CP or follow the Weyers on Twitter @wildweyers.

MALAMULELE ONWARD

malamulele 2Every child matters regardless of their having disabilities or not and every child has the potential to change the world (Images: Malamulele Onwards)

Malamulele Onward provides specialised treatment like physiotherapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy to poorly-resourced rural areas of South Africa and other African countries like Lesotho where children severely disabled by cerebral palsy have little or no hope of receiving treatment.

At the heart of the organisation is a group of volunteer healthcare professionals who have been using their expertise to help ease the strain on families who cannot afford their children the care necessary for them to lead healthier and less strenuous lives.

The organisation also offers caregiver training to parents and others who have children suffering from cerebral palsy in their care.

The Malamulele staff believe that every child matters regardless of their having disabilities or not and that every child has the potential to change the world much like you readers at home have the potential to change theirs.

Anybody who wants to make a difference in the lives of the children receiving care from the Malamulele Onwards organisation can visit their website to attain details on how to volunteer or donate to their cause.

Alternatively you can contact the organisation via email or telephonically on 011 484-9456.

Don’t hesitate, do best and play your part in bettering the lives of those in need.

For more information visit www.capepoint.co.za or call the Information Centre on (021) 780 9010/11.