UCT MBA among world’s best

Ray Maota

The University of Cape Town is the oldest
university in South Africa, with a history
spanning 175 years.
(Image: MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. For
more free photos, visit the image library)

Professor Walter Baets, director of the
UCT GSB, said the ranking will inspire
great confidence in students and
prospective students that the UCT
GSB offers an MBA amongst the best
in the world.
(Image: University of Cape Town)

MEDIA CONTACTS
• University of Cape Town
Graduate School of Business
+27 21 406 1922

RELATED ARTICLES
South African university gets global nod
First university for Mpumalanga
UJ Soweto university open for learning
South African university choir best in world

The profile of the University of Cape Town’s Graduate School of Business (UCT GSB) shot up recently when its MBA programme was rated 60th in the world by the Financial TimesGlobal MBA Top 100 Ranking. It was also named the best value-for-money MBA in the world.

The results, released on 31 January 2011, saw the ranking of the UCT GSB’s full-time programme moving up 29 places from 89th to 60th.

This was the 13th year of MBA rankings by the Financial Times, with the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania making it to number one in 2011.

The UCT GSB was the only African business school to make the top 100 in the Financial Times’ 2011 study.

Prof Walter Baets, director of the UCT GSB, said: “The UCT GSB is delighted to have moved up significantly in the Financial Times top 100 ranking this year, and to be ranked again for the seventh consecutive year testifies to the high quality of our programmes, the remarkable impact we have on students and the exceptional quality of our MBA in particular.

“The 2011 ranking will inspire great confidence in students and prospective students that the UCT GSB offers an MBA among the best in the world, and that the business school is on the move and achieving on a global level.”

In terms of international experience, international mobility and career progress, the Financial Times results showed that MBA graduates from the UCT GSB are thriving throughout the world.

“These three categories confirm that our graduates go on to achieve great things wherever they go and are highly valued in the international market,” said Baets.

According to the rankings, the top 10 MBAs in the world are offered by: the University of Pennsylvania (Wharton); London Business School; Harvard Business School; Insead; Stanford Graduate School of Business; Hong Kong UST Business School; Columbia Business School; IE Business School; Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Sloan); and IESE Business School.

Keeping up with global trends

UCT’s GSB programme places a strong emphasis on personal growth, and developing leadership skills and business acumen – hence it doing well in the categories of international mobility, international experience and career progress.

Elaine Rumboll, director of executive education at the school, said: “The increased global exposure thanks to the high ratings and other achievements has also given rise to partnership opportunities for the UCT GSB with other top global business schools.

“Change is inherent to emergent markets and we are challenged to address constantly evolving needs. This is where our true competitive advantage really lies. It is this philosophy that has resulted in the school being noticed in the international executive education arena.”

Baets added: “We aim to both raise the profile of emergent market business schools as centres of excellence and thought leadership; and provide students – both local and from all over the world – with the knowledge and skills to take on the challenges of this, the emergent market decade.”

Worldwide authority on business

The Financial Times is an international daily newspaper circulated in 24 countries across the globe. It was launched in 1888.

The publication focuses on international business-related matters, as well as company and financial market news.

It has an average daily readership of 1.9-million people worldwide, while its on-line version, FT.com, has 3-million registered users and over 200 000 digital subscribers.