Call for recognition of sign language

19 January 2012

The National Institute for the Deaf (NID) has called for sign language to be recognised as one of South Africa’s official languages.

According to the NID, sign language is the fifth most used language in the country, with more people using it, for example, than those who speak SiSwati, IsiNdebele and TshiVhenda.

The NID said that about four-million South Africans had hearing difficulty, while 1.5-million were “profoundly deaf”, with 93 percent of the deaf being unemployed.

This was revealed during public hearings on the South African Language Bill hosted by Parliament’s portfolio committee on arts and culture in Cape Town on Tuesday.

Several organisations and individuals were set to add their input into the Bill. These include the Pan South African Language Board, the Law Society of SA, Afrikaanse Taal en Kultuur Vereniging, Vriende van Afrikaans, and FW De Klerk Foundation.

Ernest Kleinschmidt, one of the board directors at the NID, was one of those invited to add his voice to the Bill. He made a compelling appeal for the recognition of sign language.

“I’m a deaf person. I’m proud of the language I use,” Kleinschmidt told the house, asking if there were people who did not use sign language in their daily life. He said people used sign language to express themselves, adding that “without communication, we are all deaf and dumb”.

Avoidable suffering

He asked that the Bill be crafted to include sign language as one of the official languages in the country.

The NID said many deaf children suffered both at school and at home as they were not understood.

Committee chairperson Thandile Sunduza said the South African Constitution had to be amended to accommodate the language.

Among other things, the South African Language Bill seeks to provide for the “regulation and monitoring of the use of official languages by national government for government purposes”. It calls for the adoption of language policies by national government departments, national public entities and national enterprises.

It also proposes the identification of at least two official languages that “a national department, national public entity or public enterprise will use for government purposes”.

Indigenous languages

During his submissions, Dr Neville Alexander of the Xhosa Africa Network called for government and non-profit organisations to preserve indigenous languages.

“If we are serious about democracy, we should take indigenous languages seriously,” Alexander said, indicating that democracy depended on people being able to communicate with each other.

He said the government should review the “language dispensation in this country”.

“Languages can cause conflict, but they can also reconcile people,” he said, cautioning that the language debate should not be a racial one.

He said languages such as Afrikaans, IsiZulu and IsiXhosa were equal, and called for each province to have a Language Act. Currently, only the Western Cape and Limpopo had legislative pieces governing languages.

Source: BuaNews